April 28, 2011
natashavc:

‘We accept Christopher’s errancies, his recklessnesses, because they are inseparable from his courage; and true valour, axiomatically, fails to recognise discretion. As the world knows, Christopher has recently made the passage from the land of the well to the land of the ill. One can say that he has done so without a visible flinch; and he has written about the process with unparalleled honesty and eloquence, and with the highest decorum. His many friends, and his innumerable admirers, have come to dread the tone of the “living obituary”. But if the story has to end too early, then its coda will contain a triumph.’
 
Amis on Hitchens

natashavc:

‘We accept Christopher’s errancies, his recklessnesses, because they are inseparable from his courage; and true valour, axiomatically, fails to recognise discretion. As the world knows, Christopher has recently made the passage from the land of the well to the land of the ill. One can say that he has done so without a visible flinch; and he has written about the process with unparalleled honesty and eloquence, and with the highest decorum. His many friends, and his innumerable admirers, have come to dread the tone of the “living obituary”. But if the story has to end too early, then its coda will contain a triumph.’

Amis on Hitchens

February 3, 2011
capitalnewyork:

Ok, if you read one The Daily-related piece today, make it this one.



I grew up in Cupertino. I love seeing its name in print. We had the shittiest computers at school.

capitalnewyork:

Ok, if you read one The Daily-related piece today, make it this one.

I grew up in Cupertino. I love seeing its name in print. We had the shittiest computers at school.

January 27, 2011
laughingsquid:

FBI Knocks Down 40 Doors in Probe of Pro-Wikileaks Attackers

laughingsquid:

FBI Knocks Down 40 Doors in Probe of Pro-Wikileaks Attackers

(via soupsoup)

January 27, 2011
ohrohin:

Meanwhile: Village Voice, The Daily Beast, Daily Mail, LAT, countless local Arizona-based blogs and newspapers…and even fucking me.
We all scooped you NYT and I get it, maybe it’s important to author trend pieces about gyms and the gross excesses of Williamsburg, but why pay reporters and editors salaries if they can’t actually perform their job functions?UPDATE: Just found this in their archives…from two years ago.

ohrohin:

Meanwhile: Village Voice, The Daily Beast, Daily Mail, LAT, countless local Arizona-based blogs and newspapers…and even fucking me.

We all scooped you NYT and I get it, maybe it’s important to author trend pieces about gyms and the gross excesses of Williamsburg, but why pay reporters and editors salaries if they can’t actually perform their job functions?

UPDATE: Just found this in their archives…from two years ago.

(via ohrohin-deactivated20120622)

January 21, 2011
ericmortensen:

Tunisia 1/18/2011 by Fred Dufour

ericmortensen:

Tunisia 1/18/2011 by Fred Dufour

January 20, 2011

neighborhoodr:

Page One debuts today at Sundance. A documentary covering a year in the life of the New York Times.

(via soupsoup)

January 17, 2011
"To appreciate the importance of a pre-modern blog, consult a database such as Eighteenth Century Collections Online and download a newspaper from eighteenth-century London. It will have no headlines, no bylines, no clear distinction between news and ads, and no spatial articulation in the dense columns of type, aside from one crucial ingredient: the paragraph. Paragraphs were self-sufficient units of news. They had no connection with one another, because writers and readers had no concept of a news ‘story’ as a narrative that would run for more than a few dozen words. News came in bite-sized bits, often ‘advices’ of a sober nature—the arrival of a ship, the birth of an heir to a noble title—until the 1770s, when they became juicy. Pre-modern scandal sheets appeared, exploiting the recent discovery about the magnetic pull of news toward names. As editors of the Morning Post and the Morning Herald, two men of the cloth, the Reverend Henry Bate (known as ‘the Reverend Bruiser’) and the Reverend William Jackson (known as ‘Dr. Viper’) packed their paragraphs with gossip about the great, and this new kind of news sold like hotcakes. Much of it came from a bountiful source: the coffee house."

Blogging, Now and Then, by Robert Darnton (via ayjay)

January 13, 2011
nickmcglynn:

Wired.com featured my friend Gabriela Herman’s Voyeuristic Blogger Portraits

nickmcglynn:

Wired.com featured my friend Gabriela Herman’s Voyeuristic Blogger Portraits

(Source: nickmcglynn)

January 5, 2011
"Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through."

(Source: barbariangroup.com, via blarghhh)

January 4, 2011
nicksummers:

INSIDE THE  MEDIA HIRING BUBBLE
“I didn’t feel like I was being interviewed for a job,” said the AP’s Ron Fournier, about the lunch that would lead to his becoming the next editor ofNational Journal.
“It was not a job interview,” said The New Republic’s Michelle Cottle, about meeting Tina Brown for coffee before agreeing to go to work for her at Newsweek.
“It wasn’t an afterthought, exactly, but …” saidGQ’s Joel Lovell, about the job offer from Hugo Lindgren at The New York Times Magazine. The two friends had been talking about how to reinvent the title so much that when they made it official, the moment was a bit of an anticlimax.
Three major media moves of 2010; three courtships best described as “meh.” Can’t a sought-after journalist at least eke out a fancy meal these days?
“The days of going to the Four Seasons and wooing someone are over,” Mr. Lovell said via cell phone from a coffee shop in Brooklyn, where he was nursing a nasty bout of pneumonia.
“Instead you do it over email, or you meet somebody at some crappier restaurant, or over a beer rather than a $300 bottle of wine.”
The expense account days are long gone, it’s true. But what the blizzard of media hirings that closed out 2010 proves is that for the select few publications that have the money to expand, it is a hirer’s market. The media-jobs thaw that The Observer first noted in April has reached a stage that might best be described as like poaching fish in a barrel. Editors like Ms. Brown, Mr. Lindgren and Matt Winkler of Bloomberg News are getting the talent they want, when they want it, and with little foreplay. They are raiding dilapidated shops like The Washington Post—which lost Howard Kurtz, Robin Givhan and Blake Gopnik to Ms. Brown in recent months—as well as powerhouses like New York, where Mr. Lindgren plucked away Sam Anderson and Adam Sternbergh in the quiet days before Christmas.
[read more]

nicksummers:

INSIDE THE  MEDIA HIRING BUBBLE

“I didn’t feel like I was being interviewed for a job,” said the AP’s Ron Fournier, about the lunch that would lead to his becoming the next editor ofNational Journal.

“It was not a job interview,” said The New Republic’s Michelle Cottle, about meeting Tina Brown for coffee before agreeing to go to work for her at Newsweek.

“It wasn’t an afterthought, exactly, but …” saidGQ’s Joel Lovell, about the job offer from Hugo Lindgren at The New York Times Magazine. The two friends had been talking about how to reinvent the title so much that when they made it official, the moment was a bit of an anticlimax.

Three major media moves of 2010; three courtships best described as “meh.” Can’t a sought-after journalist at least eke out a fancy meal these days?

“The days of going to the Four Seasons and wooing someone are over,” Mr. Lovell said via cell phone from a coffee shop in Brooklyn, where he was nursing a nasty bout of pneumonia.

“Instead you do it over email, or you meet somebody at some crappier restaurant, or over a beer rather than a $300 bottle of wine.”

The expense account days are long gone, it’s true. But what the blizzard of media hirings that closed out 2010 proves is that for the select few publications that have the money to expand, it is a hirer’s market. The media-jobs thaw that The Observer first noted in April has reached a stage that might best be described as like poaching fish in a barrel. Editors like Ms. Brown, Mr. Lindgren and Matt Winkler of Bloomberg News are getting the talent they want, when they want it, and with little foreplay. They are raiding dilapidated shops like The Washington Post—which lost Howard Kurtz, Robin Givhan and Blake Gopnik to Ms. Brown in recent months—as well as powerhouses like New York, where Mr. Lindgren plucked away Sam Anderson and Adam Sternbergh in the quiet days before Christmas.

[read more]